Home » The Reaction to Humanae Vitae by Joseph Selling

The Reaction to Humanae Vitae
by Joseph Selling

Louvain 1977

(Click here for Professor Selling’s credentials)

TABLE OF CONTENTS (to see full text see Chapter headings)
FOREWORD ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS iii
INTRODUCTION viii
ABREVIATIONS xiii
BIBLIOGRAPHY (click here to see bibliography continued) xiv

PART ONE – THE REACTION OF THE BISHOPS TO HUMANAE VITAE

CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND TO EPISCOPAL REACTION TO HUMANE VITAE

I Introduction and methodology; (click here to see the text) 1
A. The importance of episcopal reaction 3
B. Methodology 7
II Preliminary comments 9
A. Msgr.  Lambruschini’s press conference 9
B. Brief statements of bishops 11
C. Interim statements of episcopal conferences 14
D. Individual statements 16
E. Collective statements 18
III Background to the collective reactions to HV 19
A.The nature of the documentation 19
1. Pluralism of the reactions 22
Convergence and grouping of the reactions 25
B. The background of the bishops’ collective  statements 27
1. The questions and problems of the pastoral situations 29
a Demographic problems 29
b Socio-cultural factors 33
c Theological factors and questions 38
(1) The influence of the theological community 38
(2) The isolated question of contraception 39
d Summary. 41
2. The bishop’s method of composing their statements 41
a Local collegiality 41
b Attention to the sensus fidelium 43
c Relationship between the bishop’s reactions 45
C. The bishops’ use of the documents of Vatican II in their reactions to HV 48
1. The use of GS,16 and DH, 3 48
2. The use of LG,25 and DH,14 50
3. The use of GS, 50 and 51 52
4. Summary 54
CHAPTER TWO – MAJOR EPISCOPAL REACTIONS TO HUMANAE VITAE 56
I The General use and orientation toward the encyclical (click here to continue the text) 57
A. The use of the text 57
B. Situating the encyclical 58
C. General orientation to the teaching 59
II Episcopal correspondence to the moral argumentation contained in HV 61
A. The moral arguments in regard to artificial contraception 61
B. The encyclical’s teaching on christian marriage 65
C. Evaluation of episcopal correspondence with the encyclical 67
III The introduction of new ideas by the episcopal statement 68
A. New arguments in regard to artificial contraception 69
1. The conflict of duties 70
2. The lesser of two evils 73
3. The importance of motivation 74
4. The representation of HC as an “ideal” 76
5. The interpretive use of “therapeutic means” 77
B. New arguments in regard to the theology of marriage 79
C. Evaluation of episcopal divergence from the encyclical 82
IV The episcopal teachings on authority and conscience in respect of HV 83
A. The bishops’ evaluation of HV’s authority 83
B. The bishops’ evaluation of theoretical dissent from the teaching of HV on contraception 88
C. The teaching of the bishops on conscience and practical divergence from the norm of HV regarding contraception 91
1. Artifical contraception and objective sin 92
2. Artificail contraception and personal sin 93
3. The episcopal teaching on consience 96
4. The extent of magisterial authority 98
D. The bishop’s evaluation of HV’s authority on the theology of marriage 100
V The actual teaching of the bishops on HV: a summary 102
A. The bishops’ teaching on HV 104
B. Correlation of agreement and variance with other factors 104
1. Attention to extraneous data 104
2. The formulation of the question for response 106
C. Transition 108
CHAPTER THREE – THE LATER REACTIONS (click here to continue the text) 111
I. I. The extraordinary Synod of 1969: a question of authority 111
A. The synod 111
B. Reflection 115
II. The later reactions 116
A. Yugoslavi (2) : the end of the reactions 117
B. Malta (2) : a theological position 119
C. Indonesia (4) and Mexico (3) : revaluation in the developing countries 121
D. South Africa and Australia (2) : return to the original document 124
E. Ireland (3) 128
III. Evolution in episcopal teaching 129
A. The direction of change 129
B. The collegial process 130
C. The concern for the faithful 131
IV. Conclusions to Part One 132
A. The characteristics of episcopal response to HV 133
1. Agreement and acceptance of HV 134
2. Disagreement or mitigation of HV’s negative conclusions 135
3. The uncertain positions 136
B. The style of interpretation 137
APPENDICES
A. Chronological list of the episcopal statements on Humanae Vitae 1
B. List of the bishops’ statements in respect to their position on Humanae Vitae 3
C. The bishops’ use of the documents of Vatican ii in their statements on Humanae Vitae 4
D. The bisops’ use of the text of Humanae Vitae in their statements 11

v

PART TWO – GENERAL AND THEOLOGICAL REACTION TO HUMANAE VITAE

CHAPTER FOUR – INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND TO HUMANAE VITAE 140
I Introduction and method (click here to continue the text) 140
II The historical situation 142
A. The situation of doubt 142
B. From Casti Connubii to HV 142
C. Authorship 147
D. What is an encyclical? 150
III The larger issues surrounding HV 153
A. Attitudes around the enclyclical 153
B. Attidudes behind the encyclical 155
C. Data from other quarters 157
IV HV. and Vatican II 160
A. HV and GS 161
B. HV and LG 165
V HV and the Pondifical Birth Control Commission 168
VI General Response to the encyclical 177
A. General orientation 177
B. The good points of the HV 180
C. The core of the encyclical’s teaching 182
CHAPTER FIVE – THE MORAL ISSUES: CONTRACEPTION AND MARRIAGE 188
I Contraception and the core of the encyclical (click here to continue the text) 189
II The arguments of HV: exposition and critique 197
A Natural Law 197
B. Objective moral order 202
C. Intrinsic orientation 205
D. Intrinsically dishonest 210
E. The argument of totality 214
F. Evil consequences 219
G. Therapeutics 223
H. Periodic continence 225
III The arguments beyond HV: statement and critique 233
A. Arguments parallel to episcopal reactions 234
1. The conflict of duties, Excursus on the conflict of duties as a date of experience 234
2. The lesser of two evils 241
3. The importance of motivation 248
4. Characterization of HV as an ideal teaching 252
B. New approaches to the moral question of contraception 255
IV HV and the theology of marriage 260
A. The general approach of the encyclical 260
B. From responsible parenthood to the ends of marriage 263
CHAPTER SIX – THE AUTHORITY AND CONSCIENCE ISSUES 269
I Ecclesiological questions (click here to continue the text) 272
A. The magisterium 272
B. The magisterium and HV 279
C. Authority and freedom 281
II The status of HV 286
A. The argument from tradition 286
B. The validity of the argumentation 299
III The question of conscience 303
A. The notions of conscience 304
B. The norm as morally binding 309
C. The question of sin 314
IV HV in the public forum 316
A. The question of assent 316
B. The right to dissent 322
C. The evalution of reaction 325
1. The episcopal response 325
2. The theological debate 328
3. The lay participation 331
D. The question of reception 335
PART THREE – ANALYSIS OF THE REACTION TO HUMANAE VITAE
CHAPTER SEVEN – A SYNTHESIS: QUESTIONS OF SPECIAL AND FUNDAMENTAL THEOLOGY 340
I The moral issues (click here to continue the text) 343
A. The question of regulating births 343
B. The whole of sexual morality 357
C. The theology of marriage 362
II The authority issues 365
A. Situating the place of HV 366
B. The ecclesiological questions 373
C. A question of conscience 379
III Conclusions 384